Serious Warning From Edward Snowden 2021

How The Government Is Spying On You And What You Need To Know

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Serious Warning From Edward Snowden 2021

It’s Getting REALLY Serious” | Edward Snowden WARNING (2021)

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Aug 20, 2021

 

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FULL TRANSCRIPT

00:00
i think we see
00:02
something that is less about whether
00:03
you’re in government uh whether you’re
00:05
in industry
00:06
uh
00:08
and more in terms of
00:09
are you a member of this
00:12
sort of elite influential class
00:16
we see they don’t really care uh
00:18
nowadays of the high echelons of society
00:21
about whether you’re a particular
00:22
religion or this that or the other
00:25
it’s about do you have clout right do
00:26
you have access to resources do you have
00:28
access to influence if you do you’re in
00:31
uh when we look at what actually
00:32
happened for those who are not familiar
00:36
with the nsa’s uh sort of programs that
00:38
we saw
00:40
um
00:41
there is
00:43
in 2013.
00:45
uh the
00:46
cia’s uh
00:48
cto a guy named gus fund
00:51
who i actually had many meetings with
00:53
when i worked on
00:55
the cia account for dell
00:57
said
00:58
uh sort of accidentally
01:00
at a trade show
01:02
what had become the new strategy we want
01:04
to collect everything and hang on to it
01:06
forever
01:07
when you think about these digital uh
01:09
domain companies it’s not about
01:10
competition
01:12
it’s about co-opting them and
01:14
indoctrinating them and we see this
01:15
quite clearly when we look at the
01:16
timeline of what are called prism
01:18
partners these are of course the largest
01:20
internet companies in the united states
01:23
that voluntarily
01:25
began providing the government
01:28
with access to their customers records
01:30
beyond what the law required
01:34
and you see there’s a very clear
01:35
timeline where each of these guys was
01:37
targeted on the basis of their impact
01:39
and their influence in sort of the
01:41
internet uh
01:43
economy and infrastructure
01:45
and it goes on and on and on it wasn’t
01:47
just uh the providers themselves right
01:51
uh it’s also this is called upstream
01:53
collection i know you can’t see it very
01:54
well but this is a slide that
01:57
was the first public mention of it
02:00
upstream communication is your
02:02
communications
02:04
not just going to facebook specifically
02:05
or google specifically going anywhere as
02:08
it crosses internet service providers as
02:11
it crosses telecommunications companies
02:13
groups like fairview like blarney these
02:16
are the cia code names for groups like a
02:19
t
02:20
and verizon
02:22
uh and the the question is
02:25
what were they what was sort of
02:26
happening uh with this type of
02:29
information this type of material excuse
02:31
me i’m just trying to find a particular
02:33
slide here
02:34
um what what was the usefulness of this
02:38
stuff and why was it happening
02:40
in many cases it was actually profit
02:42
driven the government said we’ll
02:43
reimburse costs we’ll provide a new line
02:45
of business we’ll shelter you from
02:47
liability claims this was the central
02:49
argument in uh surveillance reform in
02:52
2008 it was pushed through
02:54
uh in response to the bush warrantless
02:56
wiretapping program
02:58
at t
02:59
had basically been unconstitutionally
03:01
spying on everybody in the united states
03:02
and around the world secretly on behalf
03:04
of the government
03:06
not just in the post-9 11 era
03:08
but you know
03:10
as long as they’ve existed
03:12
but that’s a felony in the united states
03:14
and also has civil penalties so their
03:16
customers could now sue them for the
03:18
largest corporate damages in history
03:21
uh
03:22
but in
03:23
2008 they got a new law called the
03:26
protect america act which should have
03:28
been a red flag for everybody
03:30
that gave them retroactive immunity it
03:32
said for all the laws they had already
03:34
broken the government would be sure they
03:36
could not be sued
03:38
uh shortly thereafter
03:40
the 18t changed their uh program you see
03:43
here the reference in the second
03:44
paragraph is july 2008 which is related
03:47
to the passage of this bill
03:49
where they had been collecting
03:51
everything you had done on their
03:53
infrastructure and stored records of it
03:54
going back to 1987.
03:56
so if you’re an att customer you’ve
03:58
always been an 18c customer you’re
03:59
younger you’re born in 1987 or after
04:02
everything you’ve ever said they have a
04:03
copy of they still have a copy of it
04:06
and they’re beginning to sell this to
04:07
the government as a service right
04:09
without requiring a warrant
04:12
lower standards of sharing uh simple
04:15
subpoena authorities and things like
04:17
that this is getting the legalism that
04:18
you know we don’t need to drill down
04:19
into but the idea here is
04:23
it’s not about competition
04:25
it’s about collaboration
04:27
these guys see themselves in large part
04:30
as all players on the same team
04:33
uh for influence and control this is not
04:36
to say you know that google is
04:37
specifically out to get you
04:39
uh but their interests are not the same
04:41
as yours
04:42
that that’s what the that’s what the
04:44
upstream uh agreement is about
04:46
uh is look they see this stuff
04:48
transiting the internet right and rather
04:50
than getting it at the end points where
04:52
it’s your computer or facebook’s server
04:54
right they try to catch it as it crosses
04:57
they get somebody in the middle right
04:59
whether it’s the isps the telcos and
05:01
they all sort of play side against side
05:03
group off group to do this
05:06
there is a specific example
05:08
of where nsa had lawful access uh of
05:11
course through subpoena authorities to
05:13
warrants and everything else
05:14
to submit demands to these companies uh
05:18
where a judge signs a warrant and get
05:19
anything they want even without these
05:21
new special fancy surveillance laws that
05:23
don’t use real ports they use rubber
05:24
stamp ports
05:27
but
05:29
regardless of this
05:31
what they were doing was they were going
05:33
beyond that
05:34
and they were starting to look at the
05:35
links
05:37
in google’s own network right between
05:39
their data centers so they have a data
05:40
center in the united kingdom they have a
05:42
data center of the united states one in
05:44
hong kong one in switzerland wherever
05:47
and these links between these data
05:48
centers were not encrypted right so
05:51
rather than asking google for
05:52
information what they would do is they
05:54
would just purge
05:55
on these links and they would get it for
05:57
free
05:58
they would get it under different legal
05:59
authorities they wouldn’t have any
06:00
restrictions they wouldn’t have to ask
06:02
permission right and this is a dangerous
06:04
thing in a a broader point we need to
06:06
end this question just so we can get to
06:07
other people uh
06:09
but people talk about you know
06:13
privacy versus security and they say
06:16
that’s what this is about this is not
06:17
what that’s about
06:19
this has never been a controversy of
06:21
privacy and surveillance because privacy
06:23
and or sort of privacy and security
06:26
because they are not competing values
06:28
uh when privacy increases a person their
06:32
security increases
06:34
if no one knows what you’re up to no one
06:35
can take action against you uh no one
06:38
can can basically
06:39
uh make you vulnerable when you’re being
06:41
watched and recorded everywhere you go
06:43
uh not only are you becoming less
06:45
private you’re becoming less
06:46
secure what this is really about
06:50
is this is about liberty
06:53
uh versus surveillance not versus
06:55
security or anything else like that
06:58
surveillance preys on vulnerability
07:00
surveillance preys on the lack of
07:02
privacy and when we get into this and
07:04
all these sort of end run games where
07:06
they don’t want to go to companies
07:07
unless they absolutely have to and if
07:09
they do they’ll try to get a company on
07:11
board rather than fighting them and only
07:13
as last resort will they actually
07:15
actively fight the company if the
07:16
company has any backbone
07:18
uh
07:20
the idea is what is liberty
07:23
you know if you ask a bunch of different
07:24
people in the room they might have
07:25
different ideas
07:27
but in a large way liberty and what has
07:29
made the american tradition
07:31
so powerful in our project so successful
07:35
is the ability to act without permission
07:38
liberty is freedom from permission
07:41
when the government is seeking to expand
07:43
its own liberties
07:45
at the expense of the publics
07:48
that should be something that alarms all
07:49
of us
07:51
but there’s two broad types of
07:53
surveillance that are in broad use today
07:55
mass
07:56
surveillance which is what i have
07:58
criticized what i have revealed in the
08:00
united states uh we have the fourth
08:02
amendment in the united states right
08:04
which prohibition against unreasonable
08:06
search of your private documents and
08:08
things like that seeing what you’re
08:09
doing what you’re up to
08:10
but also the
08:13
seizure of them in the first place right
08:16
which means grabbing them
08:18
now
08:19
this
08:20
uh
08:22
issue has never been settled in the
08:23
courts of modern day
08:25
the entire reason mass surveillance is
08:27
happening right now is because the court
08:29
decision happened in 1970s in a case
08:32
called smith versus maryland
08:34
where one guy
08:36
was making harassing phone calls to one
08:38
woman
08:40
she saw him drive past her house or
08:42
something like that got his license
08:44
plate
08:45
uh shortly before after one of these
08:47
calls was made
08:48
went to the police
08:49
uh the police went to the phone
08:51
companies and said look in this case we
08:54
don’t have a warrant
08:55
we do have this guy’s license plate we
08:57
did see him going past will you just
08:59
give this information to us voluntarily
09:02
and the phone company said yeah sure
09:03
whatever fine uh we’ll give it to you
09:06
in that case uh the supreme court said
09:09
this guy didn’t have a right to privacy
09:12
because they didn’t actually wiretap and
09:14
they didn’t listen to his calls they
09:15
just got the records of who he had
09:17
called and when
09:20
um
09:21
and it didn’t come from him
09:23
it came from the phone company so the
09:25
phone company said these aren’t his
09:26
records they’re our records this is
09:28
called the third party doctrine
09:31
since then it has never been revisited
09:33
uh at this level in the context of mass
09:35
surveillance but the problem is this
09:37
in that court decision they were talking
09:39
about a lone individual in a specific
09:41
instance in a specific case
09:43
the government has interpreted that in
09:45
the past 40 years to mean will if one
09:48
person in one case where they had eyes
09:51
on this guy he was doing all this stuff
09:53
and the company did in a very narrow
09:55
specific way with just this range of
09:56
calls here we can do it to everyone
09:59
everywhere
10:00
all the time forever